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Normally, the Whipping Blog is about me, my activities, my feelings, my new clips, my trips and many features I like to share with you.

This post is not about BDSM, new fetish clip, buyings or trips. It’s about a much more serious issue regarding you all over Europ (east to west) and in the world: economy. Watch this document about the “€uro” and make your opinion on Nigel Farage arguments. For my part, it’s not a Youtube masterpiece but it’s very interesting.

Few days ago, I did chat about the euro crisis with a French relative who gave me his analysis:

“Before 2002, we used a currency called French Franc (FF) In France… as there was also the Belgian Franc (FB). I’ll give you the prices in Euros to make U better understand the evolution.

During the 80-90s and early 2000s, 25€ was enough for a french student/worker to spend the week (food & transportation). We were going out on a friday/saturday night with just 15 or 20 € in our pockets to have good time in a cinema or at the restaurant then in  a night-club. It was even possible to offer some drinks to friends. I was living in a nice  apartment almost located downtown in a big french city: 50m2 for just 300€/month.

When France joined the Eurozone in 2002, prices skyrocketed about 25 to 50% in just few months: food, transportation, rents, drugs, etc. As we were a bit “lost in conversion”, many shops and supermarkets cheated consumers with higher prices… with no way return. The cinema ticket went from 6€ to 11€, the apartment mentioned above is now 600€/month, a nice moment in a restaurant is about 25€. That’s why turkish/arab restaurants became so successful because they offer a hearty meal for just 10€. 

Since the Euro, the cost of living is going higher and higher each year and entertainement is no longer affordable. Fortunetaly, we now have low-cost or no-cost technologies (smartphones, netbooks, filesharing, social networks) for communication and entertainement worldwide. Deus ex machina?

Now, I could say that we (in France) were living in heaven before the euro. Many of my friends in Spain, Portugal, Italy, Belgium, The Netherlands and Germany have the same point of view. Beware of €, Czech Republic!

If you live in the Eurozone, can you tell on this blog how things have changed for you since 2002?